Mt. Rainier and Lenticular Clouds - Dec. 2008 copyright: JMM

May 15, 2014

Historic New Bedford

Continuing on just over the bridge from Fairhaven is New Bedford.  There was a time when it was the whaling capital of the world, and it shipped lamp oil all over the planet.  Most of the city now is sprawling and somewhat run down, but the waterfront is very historic.  I can't believe I found parking, and was able to parallel park on the narrow, cobblestone streets.



Picturesque yes, but a pain to walk and drive on.


Third District Court of Bristol County.

Note the school bus.  The Whaling Museum is a popular field trip destination so there were quite a few buses in town.  The last time I was in NB was on my own 3rd grade field trip in 1973.


Quite a mixture of architecture.  You see these Greco-Roman styled buildings all over New England, side by side with older brick and and wood structures.  After the Revolutionary War & War of 1812, anything 'British' looking fell out of favour.


Since I was in town on a Monday, most of the shops were still closed.


Hard to really tell, but this building is pale purple.


Built in1787.

Customs House.

More murals

This one is in tribute to the 'missing children on milk cartons' campaign.

Zeiterion Theatre


13 comments:

  1. The shingles on that shipping place remind me of the house I grew up in on Long Island. Same exact shingles, same exact shutters except ours were brown. Yep yep!

    And, yes, those cobblestones are pretty but what a pain to walk on, even in sneakers.

    Elsie

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    1. I was afraid I was gonna pop my tires on those stones. I couldn't wait to get back on regular asphalt. I nearly twisted my ankle too.

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  2. Cobblestones are hard to walk on as a fast rate, you have to watch where you put your foot. I found that out in Paris, too. They were built for horse and buggy traffic, not cars.
    PS, JoJo, Roland answered that question about the Badlands on my blog - seems South Dakota is the one he meant. In fiction, the Navajo did get into that area. . .

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    1. Yes I saw Roland's response! I meant to leave one for him; I will go do that now. And can you imagine trying to walk on cobblestones in high heels? That's a broken wrist and shattered knee waiting to happen!

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  3. I love the pictures you share! It makes me feel like I have actually been somewhere without ever leaving my house. We have some of those old cobblestone streets here in town. They are rough as a cob but kind of cool.

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    1. Thank you! That's how I feel when I look at my friends' travel pics on FB....I have to travel abroad vicariously through them! But at least there are things locally that are worth seeing too.

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  4. HOW could you give us a pictorial tour of New Bedford and not give us just ONE picture of a Portuguese flag hanging from someone's window????? ;-)

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    1. Probably because I didn't see one! lol

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  5. You take great photos, so jealous. I always have shadows and crap in mine, that I didn't see initially. hmph. Anyway, nice visuals! :)

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    1. Thanks Daisy! :D Oh believe me, there are quite a few pictures that get deleted if the quality isn't top notch.

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  6. The cobblestones totally reminded me of Old Sacramento Street where we do a parade during Sacramento Jazz Festival. It was so difficult to march on. It was pretty, though. Your photos are beautiful. I miss Street photography.

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    1. Thank you Sonnia. You have to march on those in Sacto? Yeah that can't be comfortable at all. There are a couple of streets in Boston that are also cobblestone.

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  7. Lovely photos as always JoJo. :)
    New Bedford looks like a charming town, perhaps it has its places that have seen better days but I guess that is true of all towns.
    Yes cobblestone streets are quite a pain to walk on and drive on but they do keep people from speeding through town. :D

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