Mt. Rainier and Lenticular Clouds - Dec. 2008 copyright: JMM

April 19, 2014

Bourne, Part 2

I'm not sure what a 'Rod' is, as it relates to a unit of measurement.  

Another creepy old house



Not sure what this is...assuming it is, or was at one time, a school.  Reminds me a lot of Sandwich's H.T. Wing. 



Methodist church.  I stopped by their thrift shop on my walk and got a few things!


Jonathan Bourne Historical Center. I didn't go in.

I'm pretty sure I saw this whale at one of the seafood restaurants on Scenic Hwy on my side, a couple summers ago.  It's done to look like scrimshaw.

This is, I assume, supposed to be a look inside the living quarters of a ship. 




Whaling is, unfortunately, a part of the history of this region.




23 comments:

  1. Good morning JoJo. You made me curious and I had to look up what a rod was. According the encyclopedia Britannica a rod is : an "old English measure of distance equal to 16.5 feet (5.029 metres), with variations from 9 to 28 feet (2.743 to 8.534 metres) also being used. It was also called a perch or pole."

    Wow what an interesting place, one could spend many hours just researching the history of that area. I love that crooked, gnarled old tree - so much character to it.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Well I think the sign makers could have written 'feet' instead of 'rods'. That's the first time in my life I've ever seen that expression as a unit of measurement! lol

      Delete
  2. I looked up "rod" too... I was deeply curious after reading that sign. Here is the wikipedia link if you want to know any more:

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rod_%28unit%29

    That drawing of the interior of the ship was really well done. So many beautiful buildings in Bourne.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. There are so many cool buildings in this area....I love to shoot pics of them. I like how they did the 'scrimshaw' too.

      Delete
  3. That building definitely looked like a school or a library. That tree was made for climbing once upon a time! That corkscrew branch would be too hard to resist. And, the drawings on that whale are amazing. You live by the best towns!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I'm not sure that tree would be sturdy enough for climbing. It was right next door to the church's thrift shop and the trunk seemed pretty flimsy.

      Delete
  4. I'm glad you took closeups JoJo, of the whale drawings. What was done in the past was part of their history. How we treat these creatures now is part of ours. I like photographing old buildings and houses too. Enjoying these walkabouts with you!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks! I enjoy the walkabouts too. If it ever gets warm I'll do more!!! I do hate this region's whaling history though. As kids we were raised to be proud of it but it never sat right with me. I didn't really enjoy those graphic films and slides depicting the hunts. It was pretty horrifying.

      Delete
  5. I really love historical places, its a good opportunity to think about what life was like for our ancestors. As usual, great photos!
    Liz at Bead Contagion

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks!!! Unfortunately I read the historical markers and don't retain the info. lol

      Delete
  6. Hi human, JoJo,

    I'm always fascinated taking these virtual tours you so kindly pawst up. May whaling stay consigned to the history books.

    Pawsitive wishes,

    Penny, the friendly host of the Alphabark Challenge! :)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Penny!!! Thanks for stopping by! I'm glad you enjoy my little tours of my region! Happy Easter!

      Delete
  7. Great collection of photos! So many cool building that shows the history of the area. I love the shots of the trees, they are kind of creepy and very intriguing.
    Valerie
    Everyday Inspired

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Valerie! Thank you so much! It is pretty cool living where our nation was born!

      Delete
  8. That tree's amazing. Most people just don't look up, and they miss stuff like that.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I glanced at it on the way inside, but the lady volunteering at the thrift shop asked me if I noticed the tree so I made sure to take a good look at it on my way out.

      Delete
  9. Love the gnarly tree!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks! It's definitely gnarly!

      Delete
  10. weird to realize that some of my paternal ancestry was around that region, then. most moved west by the mid-1800's. beautiful place!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Is that so? I had no idea! If you have names I can look them up in the cemetery registry and see what I can find if you like.

      Delete
    2. My uncle has done lots of it. Apparently we have one ancestor who was tried as a witch, in Salem. My dad's maternal ancestry started in New England/1600's and his paternal was In New Amsterdam by the 1660's I think. Thanks for yiyr offer-I may take you up on it. One day I'll take an investigative journey! Meanwhile, great photos.

      Delete
  11. Still waiting for Jason Bourne to pop up in one of these posts.. ;) I love that gnarly tree!

    ReplyDelete
  12. Thanks for sharing another interesting tour JoJo! I love the scrimshaw drawings. Very cool!

    ReplyDelete