Mt. Rainier and Lenticular Clouds - Dec. 2008 copyright: JMM

September 24, 2013

McDermott Glass Studio, Part 1


I had the opportunity to attend the Glass Jam at McDermott Glass Studio & Gallery, in Sandwich, on September 14th.  There was A LOT to shoot, so this post will have to be broken up into 3 posts.  I was allowed to photograph inside the gallery, which is very rare.  Most galleries and stores don't like photography and will yell at you for doing it.  

I'll start with the hot shop

This made me laugh.  I think it's GI Joe with nunchucks.




This young woman was making a ghost.

I was so caught up with watching her pull and shape the molten glass that I didn't take many pictures of the process!  As much as I love glass, it's a very, very hot hobby and sadly, it's not something I could do.  Just making the glass beads and marbles at The Bead Factory was too hot, and all I was using was a torch.  I could not imagine working under these conditions, in summer.  






This is David McDermott, the master glass blower.  He and his wife, Yukimi Matsumoto, opened this studio in 2002.  It's awesome.  Their work is amazing and it's great to see so many young people working in the shop.


I wasn't sure if this stuff was for sale, but it sure is pretty.  Love the floats.





I spied this bucket full of cobalt glass bits on the side of the shop.  My desire to possess a few bits overcame my fear of asking if I could have some.  They say it never hurts to ask.  Yukimi offered to give me the entire bucket!  I said I just wanted a few pieces because it was so pretty, so she and I picked some big chunks.  I also got a few chunks of dark green pieces.  I was so happy!!!!!

Next up, their yard!

13 comments:

  1. Oh what a neat experience! I'm so glad you got to go!
    Tina @ Life is Good

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  2. You see? It never hurts to ask! I know that all too well. Awesome JoJo!

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  3. I am always amazed when I see glassblowers at work! To take that hot ball of glass and shape it into something beautiful is wonderful to watch. I was surprised to see those young girls wearing shorts, though. I would think they'd at least wear long pants for safety reasons!

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  4. I've seen glass blowers at work - just amazing. I would worry about those girls in shorts getting burnt... I know, I'm such a worry wart. What are you going to do with that gorgeous blue glass?

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  5. I love that they let you take pictures AND gave you the cobalt bits too. What a great bunch of people!

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  6. I'd have wanted some of that cobalt glass, too. (someone once told me - ask, they can only say no, but they might say yes) You don't get if you don't ask, nicely, of course.
    Liked the glass blowing tour, JoJo. My parents knew people who did this as a business - it would be too hot for me too in that kind of workshop.

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  7. What a cool place; although I'm sure it was anything but 'cool' in there!

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  8. Hi JoJo,

    Now, this is something I can so relate to. Those cobalt glass bits are quite something. You have brought back a reminder of when I was at a working glass museum in Taunton, Somerset, England. And before I make a complete glass of myself, I thank you for another fascinating visual tour.

    Gary

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    1. Was there a mishap when you worked at the glass museum? When I saw 'Taunton' I immediately thought you meant the town that's about 45 miles from me. I didn't know there was one in England!

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  9. Cool pictures! I bought myself a new pocket camera, unfortunately AFTER my Grand Canyon trip... Yes, I will get myself up to speed & try to post more photos.

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  10. I couldn't do that either because of the heat. Remember thinking the same thing when I went to a place where they had an open air shack set up giving a demonstration of blacksmithing using a coal fire. It was like 90 degrees that day and the incredible heat coming off of that fire...awful. Makes you wonder how some people do what they do.

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  11. If lampworking is too hot for you but you want to work with glass, why not try glass fusing, copper foiling or leaded lights? None of them involved working with heat. fused glass is placed in a kiln (OK the kiln is hot, but you don't get in it!), the other two techniques involve soldering, but a soldering iron is only hot on the tip, it doesn't make you hot to work with it.

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    1. I am thinking about going the fused glass route! Funny you should mention it. It seems much less likely that I'd burn the house down too. lol

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